Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) is a style sheet language used for describing the look and formatting of a document written in a markup language. While most often used to change the style web pages and user interfaces written in HTML and XHTML, the language can be applied to any kind of XML document, including plain XML, SVG and XUL. CSS is a cornerstone specification of the web, and almost all web pages use CSS style sheets to describe their presentation.

Simplifying your work flow goes a long way in making better CSS write-ups. This is why you should use tools that can help you do this. The following are 15 tools that help in this respect!

Have you wondered if using a CSS framework will speed up your site development? In this course, senior author James Williamson introduces the types of frameworks available—including the most popular choices among working web developers—and provides an honest assessment of the pros and cons to using a framework. He guides you through downloading a framework, setting up a directory structure, and building a framework-based site, such as structuring the HTML and working with forms. A separate chapter explores layout grids, often included with CSS frameworks, which provide a simple system for laying out page content.

CSS Tips & Tricks

Friday, 06 December 2013

CSS is a wonderful language for presenting web pages. It’s not too difficult to learn, though like most things, it does have a learning curve. In this course, Adi Purdila will give you some cool tips and tricks on how to effectively write CSS...

So you knew how to style a website with CSS, and you probably have built some “cool” stuff out of it, which make your friends impressed and your parent proud of you.

Yes, CSS is built for that purpose, but there is so much about CSS more than just styling a website. The more we learn CSS, the more we realize that there were so many things we haven’t known yet about it. And I believe that if we want to be good at something, including mastering CSS, we have to learn from the expert.

CSS is a veritable playground for type designers. It allows you to push the boundaries of typography, and explore new creative possibilities. In this course, senior lynda.com author James Williamson explores a number of advanced CSS typographic effects, including text shadows, animation, transforms, and transitions. Plus, learn to use the JavaScript libraries Lettering.js and Modernizr library to control aspects of typography that typical CSS does not.

jQuery is a multi-browser (cf. cross-browser) JavaScript library designed to simplify the client-side scripting of HTML. It was released in January 2006 at BarCamp NYC by John Resig. It is currently developed by a team of developers led by Dave Methvin. Used by over 65% of the 10,000 most visited websites, jQuery is the most popular JavaScript library in use today.

Even though it's sometimes recommended to replace the <hr> element with cascading stylesheets only using horizontal borders of other elements, I prefer <hr> as a section divider. This makes a web page more readable even in older browsers that receive only pure HTML with no style sheet...

Hello! guys in this post i would like to introduce Tooltipster jQuery plugin, which can be help you to easily create semantic, modern tooltips enhanced with the power of CSS... ;)

The tooltip or infotip or a hint is a common graphical user interface element. It is used in conjunction with a cursor, usually a pointer. The user hovers the pointer over an item, without clicking it, and a tooltip may appear a small "hover box" with information about the item being hovered over. Tooltips do not appear on mobile operating systems, since there is no cursor.

The first step in learning the fundamentals of web design is getting past acronyms like XHTML and CSS. In this user-friendly workshop, author and trainer Chad Chelius demystifies XHTML code, showing you the building blocks of a web page’s content, and explains the role that cascading style sheets (CSS) play in building web pages.